Feminist science: Getting started?

Have you ever wondered where to get started with feminist science? Wonder no more! Here is an epic list from all sorts of smart people in various disciplines — who are, full disclosure, some of my Facebook friends willing and generous enough to give their thoughts on starting points in about 5 seconds or less. Some of them are mega-experts and some of them are newer to feminist science studies, and they come from fields as diverse as philosophy, physics, neuroscience, medicine, evolution, and more! I’ve listed their suggestion, their name, and their field (and also a word doc so you can download and sort at will!). If you’ve peeked ahead to the list, you might be like: now I need a how-to-get-started for this epic get-started list! So here’s my suggestion: pick a title that intrigues you, a field that interests you, or a recommender whose name you know (or sounds interesting: like, if my name was Sari von FeministScientist, then you would DEFINITELY want to start with my recommendations). So… how to get started? By starting.

Here is the word doc of the list: Feminist Science Studies Readling List 07.07.2014 (click here!).

Recommendation Field of Reading Recommended by
Beldecos, A., Bailey, S., Gilbert, S., Hicks, K., Kenschaft, L., Niemczyk, N., Rosenberg, R., Schaertel, S., & Wedel, A. (1988). The importance of feminist critique for contemporary cell biology. Hypatia, 3(1), 61-76.
Article link
Feminist science theory; biology; cellular biology; molecular biology Miriam Solomon, Philosophy & Women’s Studies
McKee, A. (2009). Social scientists don’t say ‘titwank’. Sexualities, 12(5), 629-646. Article link Epistemology; humanities; social science; sex research; porn studies Daniel Cardoso, Communications
Fausto-Sterling, A. (2000). Sexing the body: Gender politics and the construction of sexuality. New York, NY: Basic Books.
Link to Google book (limited) version: Article link
Link to purchasing book on Amazon: Article link
Classic; sex; sex differences; gender/sex; hormones; sexuality; anatomy; intersex; nature/nurture Deborah Tolman, Social Welfare and Psychology
Karkazis, K., Jordan-Young, R., Davis, G., & Camporesi, S. (2012). Out of bounds? A critique of the new policies on hyperandrogenism in elite female athletes. The American Journal of Bioethics, 12(7), 3-16.
Article link
Sports; hormones; intersex; gender policing; sex; Shari Dworkin, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Krieger, N. (2003). Genders, sexes, and health: What are the connections–and why does it matter? International Journal of Epidemiology, 32(4), 652-657. Article link Public health; health; sex differences; gender/sex; nature/nurture Devon Greyson, Interdisciplinary Studies
Hird, M. (2004). Sex, gender, and science.
For an overview of the book, see: Article link
Link to purchasing book on Amazon: Article link
Sex; sex differences; sexuality; epistemology; materiality; philosophy Meg John Barker, Psychology
Marchessault, J., & Sawchuk, K. (Eds.). (2013). Wild science: Reading feminism, medicine and the media.
Routledge.Link to Google book (limited) version: Article link
Link to purchasing book on Amazon: Article link
Medicine; health, self-help, media, epistemology Alex Iantaffi, Program in Human Sexuality
Lederman, M., & Bartsch, I. (Eds.). (2001). The gender and science reader. Psychology Press.
Link to Google book (limited) version: Article link
Link to purchasing book on Amazon: Article link
Philosophy; sociology; history; Stacey Ritz, Medicine
Longino, H. (1995). Gender, politics, and the theoretical virtues. Synthese, 104(3), 383-397.
Article link
Philosophy Catherine Hundleby, Philosophy and Women’s Studies
International Broadcasting Trust with TVE (Producer), & King-Underwood, A. (Director). (1995). Science for survival [Motion picture]. United States: Bullfrog Films, Inc.
Link to overview of video and option to purchase: Article link
Transnational feminism; India; ecofeminism; medicine, technology Catherine Hundleby, Philosophy and Women’s Studies
Schiebinger, L. (2000). Has feminism changed science? Signs, 25(4), 1171-1175.
Article link
History; philosophy Anne Fausto-Sterling, Biology & Gender Development
Tuana, N. (2004). Coming to understand: Orgasm and the epistemology of ignorance. Hypatia, 19(1), 194-232.
Article link
Sex research; sexuality; epistemology of ignorance; philosophy; agnatology; women’s bodies Maureen Linker, Philosophy
Moyers, B. (Producer). (1988). Science and gender: Evelyn Fox Keller [Motion picture]. United States: Films Media Group.
Link to overview of video and option to purchase: Article link
Evelyn Fox Keller; history; philosophy; language Catherine Hundleby, Philosophy and Women’s Studies
Martin, E. (1991). The egg and the sperm: How science has constructed a romance based on stereotypical male-female roles. Signs, 16(3), 485-501.
Article link
Sociology; reproductive sciences; media Devon Greyson, Interdisciplinary Studies
Serano, J. (2009). Whipping girl: A transsexual woman on sexism and the scapegoating of femininity. Seal Press.
Link to Google book (limited) version: Article link
Link to purchasing book on Amazon: Article link
Transgender studies; sexual diversity Lisa DeBruine, Neuroscience and Psychology
Traweek, S. (2009). Beamtimes and lifetimes: The world of high energy physicists. Harvard University Press.
Link to Google book (limited) version: Article link
Link to purchasing book on Amazon: Article link
Physics; philosophy; sociology Greg van Anders, Physics
Hrdy, S. (1986). Empathy, polyandry, and the myth of the coy female. In r. Bleier (Ed.), Feminist approaches to science (pp. 119-146). New York: Pergamon Press.
Article link
Anthropology; evolution; primate research; psychology Laura Ruetsche, Philosophy
Harding, S. (2006). Science and social inequality: Feminist and postcolonial issues. University of Illinois Press.
Link to Google book (limited) version: Article link
Link to purchasing book on Amazon: Article link
Philosophy; postcolonial studies; class; nation; race Janine Farrell, Public Health
Cole, E., & Stewart, A. (2001). Invidious comparisons: Imagining a psychology of race and gender beyond differences. Political Psychology, 22(2), 293-308.
Article link
Psychology; race; intersectionality Lilia Cortina, Psychology and Women’s Studies
Fisher, M., Garcia, J., & Chang, R. (Eds.). (2013). Evolution’s empress: Darwinian perspectives on the nature of women. Oxford University Press.
Link to Google book (limited) version: Article link
Link to Purchasing Book on Amazon: Article link
Evolutionary Psychology; Anthropology Maryanne Fisher-MacDonnell, Psychology
Roy, D. (2012). Neuroethics, gender, and the response to difference. Neuroethics, 5, 217-230.
Article link
Neuroethics; neuroscience Karen Rommelfanger, Neuroethics
Ritz, S., Antle, D., Cote, J., Deroy, K., Fraleigh, N., Messing, K., Parent, L., St-Pierre, J., Vaillancourt, C., & Mergler, D. (2013). First steps for integrating sex and gender considerations into basic experimental biomedical research. The FASEB Journal, 28(1), 4-13.
Article link
Biomedicine; cellular biology; molecular biology Stacey Ritz, Medicine
Einstein, G. (Ed.). 2007. Sex and the brain. Cambridge, Mass. MIT Press.
Original Link to purchase book: Article link
Psychology; Neuroscience; sex differences Leeat Granek, Psychology, Health
Rutherford, Alex. “Home – Psychology’s Feminist Voices.” Home – Psychology’s Feminist Voices. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 July 2014. Article link Psychology Leeat Granek, Psychology, Health

Also, experts: I know you’re like: “WHAT?! I can’t believe she left out book X. Book X is the foundation of everything!” I feel you. Send me your suggestion (and I’ll add it in) or note it yourself in the comments! Even just names are fine – we can add in citations later 🙂

Here also is a reading list from the fabulous Anne Fausto-Sterling, who was kind and generous enough to provide a recommendation AND TWO reading lists she has worked on for some time: (1) fem sci stu-biblio F-S This is a list of books in both gender & science and race & science. And also links to some great sites (e.g., history of race in science, feminist theory, etc.). (2)Feminist Science Studies F-S This is a one-page list of relevant authors from philosophy, biology, history, archaeology, anthropology, and physics.

And, here also is also another reading list from the generous Maryanne Fisher-MacDonnell, Rosemarie Sokol-Chang, and Sylis C.A. Nicolas for evolutionary psychology on various important topics in the field (e.g., female competition, female mating strategies) along with a long section on comments/critiques of the field. feps list 5.27.14

Finally, because I’m pretty pleased that everyone else did the hard work but I’m not immune to guilt, I’m going to lay my own cards on the table! Here’s a reading list for a graduate level course on feminist science studies I taught a little while ago. It covers disciplines (e.g., evolution/ecology), perspectives (e.g., postcolonial science, epistemology of ignorance), and topics (e.g., human/non-human, trans/intersex). Some of my favorite authors – in addition to the many listed below and in others’ lists- are there, like Kim TallBear, Banu Subramaniam, Joan Fujimura, and Patricia Hill Collins! Syllabus Feminist Science Studies van Anders 01.11.13

Did your to-read list just explode?! Mine did. So I'm going to close my eyes and point to ONE reading and read that.

Did your to-read list just explode?! Mine did. So I’m going to close my eyes and point to ONE reading and read that.

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1 Response

  1. Anonymous says:

    Thank you so much for sharing this!

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